Week #3

Renaissance Era

Music: Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (c. 1525 - 1594)

Art: Sandro Botticelli (c. 1445 – 1510)

Poetry: William Shakespeare (1564 -1616)


(Find all notebooking pages for these lessons under "Everything.")


Monday:

Listen

This week listen to Palestrina's madrigals:

Fill out Music Appreciation Listening Sheet(s).

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Tuesday:

Study

"Portrait of a Youth" c. 1482/1485 Painting


Fill out Art Appreciation Sheet answering some of the questions about the painting.

Listen to some of yesterday's music again to fill the rest of your time.

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Wednesday:

Listen

Listen again to Palestrina's madrigals:

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Thursday:

Study

Study again: "Giuliano de' Medici" c. 1478/1480 Painting

Compare and contrast today's painting with Tuesday's.

Listen to some of yesterday's music again to fill the rest of your time.

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Friday:

Read and Study

Sonnet 73:

That time of year thou mayst in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou see’st the twilight of such day
As after sunset fadeth in the west;
Which by and by black night doth take away,
Death’s second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou see’st the glowing of such fire,
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
As the death-bed, whereon it must expire,
Consum’d with that which it was nourish’d by.
This thou perceiv’st, which makes thy love more strong,
To love that well, which thou must leave ere long.

Watch

Read and Study

Sonnet 104:

To me, fair friend, you never can be old,
For as you were when first your eye I ey’d,
Such seems your beauty still. Three winters cold,
Have from the forests shook three summers’ pride,
Three beauteous springs to yellow autumn turn’d,
In process of the seasons have I seen,
Three April perfumes in three hot Junes burn’d,
Since first I saw you fresh, which yet are green.
Ah! yet doth beauty like a dial-hand,
Steal from his figure, and no pace perceiv’d;
So your sweet hue, which methinks still doth stand,
Hath motion, and mine eye may be deceiv’d:
For fear of which, hear this thou age unbred:
Ere you were born was beauty’s summer dead.

Watch

Copy the poems on the Poetry Appreciation Sheet and answer questions about the poems.

Listen to this week's music again to fill the rest of your time.

Discussion

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